AP Physics B

Just the Facts

 

When is it?: Tuesday May 14, 2002

 

How much does it cost? 

$77 unless you qualify for a financial aid price of $22

 

How long is it?: 

-The 70 Multiple Choice section is 1.5 hours long (worth 50% of the grade)

(1.28 min/question)

-The 6-8 free response questions section is also 1.5 hours long (worth 50% of the grade) (11-15 min/question)

What is the breakdown of the test?

Mechanics 35% (Sub-topics in order of importance: Newton’s Laws, Kinematics, Work/Energy/Power, Linear Momentum, Circular Motion/Rotation, Oscillations and Gravitation)

Electricity and Magnetism 25% (Sub Topics in order of importance:  Electric circuits, Electrostatics, Electromagnetism, Conductors and Capacitors, Magnetostatics)

Atomic and Nuclear Physics 15%

Thermal Physics 10% (Sub Topics:  Kinetic theory, Thermodynamics, Temperature and heat)

Optics 10%

Waves 5%

 

What is not on the exam?

            General or Special Relativity

            Quantum mechanics is not as detailed as it is in Chemistry

    

Do I lose points for Guessing?

  Each right answer is worth 1 point, but 1/4 point is subtracted for wrong answers.

 

How well do I have to do on the exam to get the grade I want?

            AP Exam Grade           Rough % needed

                        5                      75% or better

                        4                      60% or better

                        3                      45% or better

                        2                      35% or better

 

What Kind of calculator can I have?

    First of all, there are no calculators allowed on the multiple choice section.

     Programmable or graphing calculators are allowed on the free-response

 

What do they give me on the test?

For the Multiple Choice Section:  Table of Information (see attached from last year)

For the Free-Response Section:  Table of Information and Table of Equations (see attached from Last year)

Percentage Goals for Examinations

Content Area

Physics B

Physics C

I. Newtonian Mechanics

35%

50%

  1. Kinematics (including vectors, vector algebra, components of vectors, coordinate systems, displacement, velocity, and acceleration)
    1. Motion in one dimension
    2. Motion in two dimensions including projectile motion

7%

9%

  1. Newton's laws of motion (including friction and centripetal force)
    1. Static equilibrium (first law)
    2. Dynamics of a single particle (second law)
    3. Systems of two or more bodies (third law)

9%

10%

  1. Work, energy, power
    1. Work and work-energy theorem
    2. Conservative forces and potential energy
    3. Conservation of energy
    4. Power

5%

7%

  1. Systems of particles, linear momentum
    1. Center of mass *
    2. Impulse and momentum
    3. Conservation of linear momentum, collisions

4%

6%

  1. Circular motion and rotation
    1. Uniform circular motion
    2. Angular momentum and its conservation
      1. Point particles*
      2. Extended bodies including rotational inertia *
    1. Torque and rotational statics
    2. Rotational kinematics and dynamics *

4%

9%

  1. Oscillations and gravitation
    1. Simple harmonic motion (dynamics and energy relationships)
    2. Mass on a spring
    3. Pendulum and other oscillations
    4. Newton's law of gravity
    5. Orbits of planets and satellites
      1. Circular
      2. General *

6%

 

 

Percentage Goals for Examinations

Content Area

Physics B

Physics C

II. Thermal Physics

10%

N/A

B.       Temperature and heat

1.        Mechanical equivalent of heat

2.        Specific and latent heat (including calorimetry)

3.        Heat transfer and thermal expansion

3%

 

C.       Kinetic theory and thermodynamics

1.        Ideal gases

a.        Kinetic model

b.       Ideal gas law

2.        Laws of thermodynamics

a.        First law (including processes on pV diagrams)

b.       Second law (including heat engines)

7%

 

 

Note: Subtopics that are covered in Physics C, but not Physics B, are marked with an *.

Percentage Goals for Examinations

Content Area

Physics B

Physics C

III. Electricity and Magnetism

25%

50%

C.       Electrostatics

1.        Charge, field, and potential

2.        Coulomb's law and field and potential of point charges

3.        Fields and potentials of other charge distributions

a.        Planar

b.       Spherical symmetry *

c.        Cylindrical symmetry *

4.        Gauss's law *

5%

15%

D.      Conductors, capacitors, dielectrics

1.        Electrostatics with conductors

2.        Capacitors

a.        Parallel plate

b.       Spherical and cylindrical *

3.        Dielectrics *

4%

7%

D.      Electric circuits

1.        Current, resistance, power

2.        Steady-state direct current circuits with batteries and resistors only

3.        Capacitors in circuits

a.        Steady state

b.       Transients in RC circuits *

7%

10%

E.       Magnetostatics

1.        Forces on moving charges in magnetic fields

2.        Forces on current-carrying wires in magnetic fields

3.        Fields of long current-carrying wires

4.        Biot-Savart and Ampere's law *

4%

10%

F.       Electromagnetism

1.        Electromagnetic induction (including Faraday's law and Lenz's law)

2.        Inductance (including LR and LC circuits) *

3.        Maxwell's equations *

5%

8%

 

Percentage Goals for Examinations

Content Area

Physics B

Physics C

IV. Waves and Optics

15%

N/A

D.      Wave motion (including sound)

1.        Properties of traveling waves

2.        Properties of standing waves

3.        Doppler effect

4.        Superposition

5%

 

E.       Physical optics

1.        Interference and diffraction

2.        Dispersion of light and the electromagnetic spectrum

5%

 

E.       Geometric optics

1.        Reflection and refraction

2.        Mirrors

3.        Lenses

5%

 

 

Percentage Goals for Examinations

Content Area

Physics B

Physics C

V. Atomic and Nuclear Physics

15%

N/A

E.       Atomic physics and quantum effects

1.        Alpha particle scattering and the Rutherford model

2.        Photons and the photoelectric effect

3.        Bohr model and energy levels

4.        Wave-particle duality

10%

 

F.       Nuclear physics

1.        Radioactivity and half-life

2.        Nuclear reactions (including conservation of mass number and charge, and mass-energy equivalence)

5%